Lead365: A Step in My Personal Journey to be an Impactful Leader

By Cristi Rader

Do you ever wonder if you are an effective or impactful leader? I do. What are the qualifications I possess to be an impactful leader? As a young professional, how do I develop my skills to be more effective? How do I inspire others to want to lead in their community or business or academic environment? Hmm-insert thinking emoji.

I received the Corvias Foundation Scholarship in 2007, graduated in 2011, and am now an Opportunity Advisor with Corvias in Cary, North Carolina. Corvias empowers its employees to be truly impactful and its Foundation Scholars to reach higher in all that they do. This year I had the privilege of representing both Corvias employees and scholars at the National Lead365 Conference. Lead365 is an organization “committed to empowering collegiate leaders and professionals dedicated to developing student leaders, to be prepared to serve the greater social good 365 days a year”. For the last three years, Corvias Foundation has sent a small group of scholars and team members to the Lead365 Conference in Orlando, Florida, to support their personal and professional development and to continue to build a network of Corvias Foundation scholars, alumni, partners, and mentors.

I attended the conference as a professional with three college students from across the country: Lahela Daniels, a Corvias Foundation scholar attending the University of Oregon; Sara, a foreign exchange student from Egypt and a Resident Assistant at Wayne State University; and Gerald, a Resident Advisor at Howard University.  Sara and Gerald are Corvias partner scholars; Corvias partner scholars are distinguished students that attend universities with which Corvias has a partnership.*  Through their jobs both Sara and Gerald help students navigate the challenges of their college journeys.

Lahela and I attended the Lead365 Conference with the Corvias Foundation charge to make a difference in our communities and campuses. Although we both are a part of the Corvias Foundation family, this was the first time I had the opportunity to meet Lahela. Her energy and enthusiasm is contagious, and she plans to use her sociology major with a minor in legal studies to make a change on campus. I had the privilege of connecting with her on a personal and professional level during our time together in Orlando, to take risks, and by the end of the three-day conference I could see the new confidence rising out of Lahela. After the conference Lahela shared with me, “I feel that the most important thing that I’ve taken away from the conference is that in order to create your foundation, you must first establish your mission, your vision, and your statement of values. My vision is to start with my community; mentor, influence, and inspire those my age and younger, and to give hope to those who are older, that I will change the world day by day.”

“Leadership isn’t impossible, it means I’m-possible.” This was one of the most resonant quotes from a presenter at the Lead365 Conference. Although, it is fairly easy to listen to your inner critic, this statement reminds me that how we individually show up in failure, truly defines the leaders that we are.  I am continuously learning to be an empowering leader to not only my Corvias teammates but my fellow Corvias Foundation scholars and alumni. Attending the Lead365 Conference allowed me the opportunity to overpower my “inner critic” and allow myself to evolve my leadership skills. I learned from many leaders and presenters in higher education that it is not easy to be a leader, but it is indeed possible. Not only for me but for others too. I can evolve my leadership skills and direct a passionate pursuit to make a difference in others who tell themselves becoming a leader is impossible. I’m-possible and so are they!

The truth is, I do not need someone else to tell me I am doing a good job as a leader, but I do need to feel the 360-degree impact of my actions. James Robilotta, speaker, author, personal coach, and host of the 2017 conference said it best, “As leaders, it’s not only your job to impact others’ lives; it’s your job to let them impact yours.”

Through the Lead365 conference, I have learned that I am a more impactful leader when I:

  • Listen to understand rather than offer solutions—when I am present
  • Engage openly
  • Allow others to impact me and challenges I am facing
  • Take the time to let others share their story
  • Ask for help
  • Recognize moments when a person is showing empathy because we both need this moment.

I know I am being an outstanding leader when the team I am a member of is allowed to learn together. We can learn so much when we value the contributions on all sides.

Corvias Foundation has always inspired me to Imagine. Empower. Reach Higher., and now I can also build upon lessons from the Lead365 Conference to Explore. Engage. Evolve.

*Corvias partners with higher education and government institutions nationwide to solve their most essential systemic problems and create long-term, sustainable value through our unique approach to partnership.


Military Child Care On The Table in Budget Negotiations

As Democratic and Republican leaders continue to try to work out a long-term solution to funding the government, President Trump’s proposed budget has emerged as one key starting point in the negotiations. One potential change in the budget could have a large impact on people connected to Corvias Scholars: substantial cuts to child-care programs for military families.

The military has a reputation for providing excellent child-care, with over 700,000 children participating in one of the military’s many child-care programs. Programs are affordable, with parents paying on a sliding scale based on income, and ninety-five percent of the programs are nationally accredited. The programs have been justified by the demanding nature of the military’s work, and the need to ensure army kids have a place where they can receive a stable source of  high-quality support and education.

In President Trump’s proposed budget, such programs would receive about $100 million less in funding. MilitaryTimes was unable to determine why these funding levels would decrease after the proposed budget was unveiled.

Losing such programs could make it difficult for military spouses to pursue employment, or eliminate a source of support for spouses parenting alone during a deployment.

However, funding for military family support programs saw a net overall increase in President Trump’s budget due to a $200 million increase in ‘warfighter and family services.’ While a breakdown of that additional funding was not available, advocates for military families suggested it may not be enough to keep up with the demands of a growing military.

It’s also important to note that military child-care services have already been impacted by budgetary negotiations. Bases in Wiesbaden, Germany, and Fort Knox, Kentucky had to temporarily close certain child-care services after a hiring freeze issued by the President made it difficult to hire enough staff to keep the facilities open. While it is possible to ask for exceptions to the hiring freeze, a sluggish hiring process has led to long wait lists for spots in child-care facilities across the military.

This is also not the first time programs benefiting military families have been targeted for cuts. In one example, programs that allow military children to use the GI bill have been targeted for elimination as a budget-saving move.

While none of these cuts are imminent, the fact that they are emerging in proposed budgets certainly suggests that they may be coming down the pipeline. It will be important to stay tuned to see how the budget might ultimately impact military families, and to speak up if ultimately these changes produce effects that matter a lot to you. Contacting your representatives in Congress is a fantastic way to show elected officials what is important to you, and is particularly important with issues like this that only affect a subset of our population. Websites like https://contactingcongress.org/ make it easy to find your representatives’ phone numbers and email addresses. As these potential changes to military programs take shape, consider speaking out if this issue matters to you!



Scholar Spotlight: Sarah Nakasone

As we often learn during our Corvias Alumni Summit, members of our family are constantly doing inspiring and world-changing things that somehow we don’t know about. A few months ago, I saw a post from current scholar Sarah Nakasone that mentioned she was going to be spending the summer in Africa working first-hand in implementing HIV transmission prevention through a truly life-changing medical treatment. I’ll let her explain the rest, but I think that after reading – you’ll be impressed & inspired to invoke change in your own community.

For those who have not yet met you in person, please tell us a little about yourself!

My name is Sarah Nakasone and I’m a current junior at the University of Chicago where I study epidemiology and international power relationships in medical activism (think WHO, United Nations policy but with a lot bit of Ebola and HIV thrown in). My father is an army officer, though my best friend has since joined the USNA, making the Army-Navy football game a fractious time in my circle of family and friends. My family was at Fort Meade, Maryland (about an hour from DC) when I received the Corvias Scholarship though they have since moved to Virginia, so I consider Chicago home for now. Future plans change with alarming regularity, though I assume it will have something to do with HIV considering my recent work. Ideally, I’d like to complete a master’s program in epidemiology and then go on to medical school, the goal being to work in infectious disease with low-income communities here in the US.

Fun fact wise- after growing up as a military brat, I have a huge passion for travel and will have visited five different continents in the span of about a year this December. My friends joke that if they want to find me, it’s probably easier to just spin a globe and pick a spot randomly than anything else. I also bake anytime I get stressed, a hobby that has served me well when trying to build goodwill with new flat mates.

How did you become aware of the project or get in contact with the Gates Foundation? Where did you find your passion for helping those affected with HIV, and were you specifically looking for a project in this area?

I started working in HIV prevention my senior year of high school. I was part of a dedicated engineering program where all of us were required to complete a capstone project and my project focused on developing apps to help educate youth about HIV (Baltimore, where I was going to school, still has a large problem with HIV). Considering I was going to a Catholic school, it was seen as a little bit of a ‘risqué’ project (I remember the principal scolding me because the phrase ‘HIV and other STIs’ apparently made our very conservative nuns uncomfortable). I think that stigma was what made me initially interested in continuing prevention work- I wasn’t used to being told that I shouldn’t do something, and that resistance made me want to do it even more.

(This is, of course, a TERRIBLE reason for doing anything so don’t follow my example here.)

I continued doing HIV prevention work once I got to college, still running on this ‘how-dare-someone-tell-me-what-I-should-and -shouldn’t-be-doing streak’ and ended up on a project researching PrEP. PrEP is this new drug that, if taken once a day, can prevent an HIV negative person from getting infected (think of it a little like birth control for HIV!) The Southside of Chicago, where I live, has a huge problem with HIV infections. As it stands, one in three black gay or bisexual men are HIV positive and we fully expect within the next few decades, about half of them will have been infected with the virus.

It is probably the hardest work I have ever done. I remember days when I would come home in tears because guys in the study would confess to me how their friends were dying of AIDS or because every single person we tested that day would be positive for the virus. But it’s also what finally gave me a good reason for doing the work. I would talk to men who had been activists for decades and committed their lives to stopping those around them from getting infected. People who confessed to me how much their lives had changed because of PrEP- because they didn’t have to worry about getting infected. We were making a difference with our research, even if it was just in the tiniest of ways.

As part of my degree program, we are required to do internationally-focused work and I wanted to continue working with PrEP. In circumstances that probably sound better suited for a networking conference (I have a friend who fought Ebola with someone who was engaged to a guy, who worked with a woman who needed someone with my background), I basically fell into the project on which I currently work. My current boss, Dr. Maryam Shahmanesh at the University College London, was working on a district-wide evaluation of DREAMS and, given my background with PrEP, she invited me to join the team and help design parts of the evaluation that would try to see how we could best give PrEP to young women. There wasn’t any formal application here, I just got very lucky that I had done similar work in the US and knew some well-connected people.

To back up a little bit, because I know that’s a lot of acronyms and introductions at once, DREAMS is a program that’s running in 10 sub-Saharan countries in Africa and is funded by the Gates Foundation and PEPFAR (a US program that tries to help fight AIDS abroad). DREAMS wants to make sure that young women grow up determined, resilient, empowered, AIDS-free, mentored, and safe so that we can cut rates of HIV by 40% in girls. I’ve been specifically working with the DREAMS program in uMkhanyakude District here in South Africa. The district is incredibly affected by HIV- 35% of the population has it- and young girls are at the most risk given that they generally don’t have the power to ask their partners to use condoms and get involved with much older men (‘sugar daddies’) just so they can make a little money for school or food or shopping. We think that PrEP can be a real help here because they would be able to take it without their partners knowing, but the South African government is still trying to plan how to get it to young women. My job has been to research how best we could get PrEP to young women (e.g. who should give it out, what sort of community education should we do, how should we market it, etc.)

It’s a different sort of life, being here. I live in a guest house with other researchers so often we will stay at the office for 10ish hours a day, only to go home and debate our research over shared meals and wine (good wine is about 40 rand a bottle, or $3.50) Most of us were born somewhere else and have no family here, so we become each other’s family. In my three months here, I’ve lived with a French nanotechnologist, a Malawian Ph. D student, a bunch of Brits, an Australian doctor, and a whole mess of South Africans. It made 4th of July an incredibly interesting affair because we had a multi-cultural bunch of us sharing my home-made apple pie with no one but me being quite sure as to why we had to celebrate anything.

What was the biggest thing you learned about the population you were working with that surprised you?

I think what surprised me most about living and working here is how often HIV does not rank as the primary concern for so many people. Many of the people in my generation lost parents to the disease and many of them are likely to be infected by it one day but it isn’t necessarily the thing about which they worry the most. 80% of the people here are on government assistance because they can’t find work, for example. It’s really hard to think about a disease that may affect you someday in the future if you’re starving today. It’s one of the many factors that will make ending AIDS here extremely difficult.

What did you learn about yourself during this experience both professionally and personally?

I loved my work this summer and I count myself as so, incredibly lucky to have had this opportunity. I have been surrounded by amazing people and have had the chance to grow both as a person and researcher here. I do not take that for granted. But I also realize that this is probably not the area of the world in which I want to work. AIDS in Africa gets a lot of attention (as it should) but we have a huge problem with AIDS in America as well- we just don’t have the problem in groups that attract a lot of interest and funding. It’s easy to spin stories about young women who don’t have the ability to negotiate for condoms and are thus at risk for HIV. It’s less easy to talk about injection drug users or gay black men or transgender women.

Something that was mentioned a lot during our Corvias Alumni Summit this year was the idea of hope. Knowing that our world is in desperate need of hope right now – what kind of hope do you now have after finishing this project for this population? Can that hope be transferred on a global scale?

Hope has been something I’ve thought a lot about here as well. There are so many days when you get caught up in these statistics about how many people who are infected and the numbers don’t seem to be getting better or they’re not getting better fast enough, no matter how hard we try. Somedays it feels a lot like lobbing water balloons at a forest fire. But then you talk to nurses here who remember what things were like before there were drugs to treat HIV and how their patients would die alone. How all day they would listen to the cries of people they could not save.

And we are so far past that. HIV isn’t a death sentence anymore and people here largely have access to the drugs they need to treat it. What seems like baby steps in the moment become immense progress in the end when you have the opportunity to look back.

I think that’s what gives me hope, both here and in HIV work in general. You have so many people who are committed to making this incremental progress, even when it doesn’t look like progress at all. I keep this quote anyplace I work so that I remember it:

“When we study the biographies of our heroes, we find that most of their time was spent in quiet preparation doing tiny, decent things, until one historic moment catapults them to center stage and causes them to tilt empires.”

            I am surrounded by people every day trying to do tiny, decent things. And that gives me a lot of hope- both for here and for our world.

Sarah Blog 1Sarah Blog 2Sarah Blog 4Sarah Blog 5Sarah Blog 3

Interview & Pictures: Sarah Nakasone
Questions provided by: Samantha Seifert