10 Years of Serving on the Homefront

By Doug Brown, Class of 2007

Doug in his father’s flight helmet, Hanau AAF, Germany 1991

One of my earliest memories as a military child is greeting my Dad’s unit back to Hanau Army Airfield in Germany upon their return from Desert Storm in the early 90’s. To this day I can remember the sights and sounds of everything happening around me in that old Army hanger. This is the earliest indication of being an ‘Army Brat’ and understanding what it would later mean to serve on the home-front. Over the next 18 years of my young life, my mother, sisters, and I would serve here at home while Dad was doing his part in some foreign land halfway across the globe. In 2007, after 23 years of selfless service to his country, my father finally hung up his flight suit and combat boots one last time as a soldier. This also happened to be my senior year of high school and just in time for the next chapter in my life, college.

The Year 2007 saw:

  • Apple introduced the world’s first iPhone
  • Virginia Tech Mass Shooting occurred on the Blacksburg Campus
  • The Mitchell Report claimed use of steroids in Major League Baseball
  • US housing bubble began to burst as home prices dropped drastically
  • Nancy Pelosi elected first female Speaker of the House
  • Barack Obama announced his presidential candidacy
  • Corvias Foundation offered its first scholarship class under the name Our Family for Families First

As with most military families, neither of my parents had gone to college or gotten degrees . Military parents often married young and had multiple children with another on the way. We weren’t poor by many standards and always had food on the table and a roof over our heads, but we certainly weren’t taking lavish family vacations or driving the newest cars. So, when it came to school and college, I knew my best shot at being a first-generation college student was a combination of good grades, scholarships, and a little luck. One day in the spring of 2007 while browsing my high school’s newsletter, I saw a section listing scholarship opportunities. Of the dozen or so scattered across the page, one in particular struck me as both odd and a potential candidate at the same time:

“Our Family for Families First Scholarship Foundation and Picerne Military Housing seeks Military Dependents for annual scholarship…”

I had heard of odd scholarships for those that are left-handed, shorter or taller than average, could finish a Rubik’s Cube blindfolded with one hand behind their back, etc., but I had never heard of a scholarship directed solely to children of the military. Even with a great GPA, I still figured myself a longshot due to the of the competitive nature and high demand of scholarships , but I applied anyway at the request of my counselors and family. I got letters of recommendation from JROTC instructors, coaches, teachers, and even my school principal. I poured over my entrant essay for days trying to get the wording just right. This was the break I had been waiting for…this was my chance to better myself and earn a college degree, something my parents hadn’t yet done…ANDDDD I was rejected. I was heartbroken. In what would become the silver lining and a similar story among my other scholarship alumni, I was asked to apply again as they would be doing two award rounds that year to jump-start the new foundation. With that encouragement and a bit of hesitation at the thought of being rejected again, I reapplied. This time, I was accepted into the inaugural class of recipients for the newly formed Our Family for Families First Foundation. Not only would I be going to college, but with almost all expenses paid, the great financial burden upon myself and my family had been lifted.

Like many college freshman, I struggled with the new adjustment of being away from home and, relatively, out on my own. I was just another young, 18 year-old kid trying to find my place amongst a world much different from the strict and orderly military life I had grown accustomed to. Luckily, during the annual recipient award ceremony in Washington, D.C., I had been introduced to Maria Montalvo and Melissa Ballou. They were directors at the Foundation and would be our “guides” throughout our time in college. I wasn’t sure just how much that meant at the time, but it is evident today what they truly mean to the success of every recipient. When I began to struggle with harder classes my second semester, Melissa was there to check-in every so often and see if there was anything The Foundation could do to help keep me on track. Not only had Corvias given me a scholarship, but they were personally vested in my individual success. They were “Serving on the Homefront” as I had done for my father all those years ago.

The fall of my sophomore year, I decided to really press my luck and pledge a fraternity. After-all, I had survived my first year with only a few minor bumps in the road. I was pretty confident that a few social events here and there couldn’t be too disruptive, right? Well, as I am sure you can guess, I was wrong…I actually managed a sub-1.0 GPA! I didn’t even think that was remotely possible, but I am here to confirm, it is! Contrary to what you might assume, it wasn’t for lack of trying or skipping class—the older Brothers in the fraternity made sure we were in class every day and attended study mandatory study halls. However, the late nights and distractions of constant events and functions certainly took my focus away from what was most important to me. There were just no excuses, but it didn’t change the fact that I was completely devastated. I was an ‘A-B’ student in high school and had just about breezed my way through my freshman year. How was this any different? Nevertheless, Maria and Melissa were there to help me with suggestions at a time when I feared losing my scholarship altogether. They had ideas I had never remotely considered, such as, visiting my professors on a regular basis and speaking to my department counselors about tutors and study sessions. Again, the Foundation was “Serving on the Homefront”.

In the summer of 2009, I was invited to the annual recipient award ceremony. Now held in Boston, the event also included a college orientation for recipients.    I hosted a “no-adults” 1-on-1 session with the incoming class so that we could, openly and honestly, respond to any concerns that the new recipients may have had about college life. In planning this panel, The Foundation provided multiple new benefits to it members. New scholars were given the chance to learn from their senior peers, who were already experiencing the same challenges they would soon face. Rather than the college marketing orientation weekend, this was a no-holds-barred conversation about what to really expect when you first step onto campus. The less obvious benefit was the opportunity to offered to the other scholars and myself.  As the youngest of 3 siblings, I was usually the one being looked after by my sisters. This was the first time I really had a chance to be a leader and mentor for those around me. I can’t say for sure, but it was definitely the spark of who I would later become as a part of The Foundation and Alumni community.  It was also the stern kick-in-the-pants motivation I needed to get my schooling back on track and finish my final two years with a bang and make The Foundation proud.

Finish with a bang is what I did! The next two years were full of your typical ups and down in life, but I persevered with the support and guidance of Maria and Melissa who always seemed to pop in just when I needed them most. In the Spring of 2011 I finally walked across the stage and accepted my Bachelor’s degree in Marketing and Commerce & Business Administration with a Sales Specialization. To the joking amazement of many, I also managed to escape in only four years. I had made my family proud, I had earned my degree and I had finally fulfilled my promise to The Foundation…or so I had thought! Shortly thereafter I received a call from Maria asking if I would be the guest speaker at the annual new scholar & alumni award ceremony. As somewhat of a blossoming leader, I was beyond excited to again get to share my experiences with my peers, the new scholars, their parents, and the rest of The Foundation. I chose to speak about how failure is just a stepping stone of success, a lesson I had learned through the support Maria, Melissa, and the Foundation.

In 2014 the Foundation introduced a new benefit by organizing the first annual Alumni Leadership Summit. We were tasked with brainstorming how to help future scholars succeed and how we could grow the mission of the Foundation beyond its’ original scope to also give back in each of the communities we now lived and served in. Over the next several years, this would become an annual gathering of “the family” as we often called it to honor the original Our Family for Families First name. Together we would derive our current mission statement and alumni vision, perform community service projects, and inspire each other to continue to do good at home.  Perhaps most importantly, we have grown closer to one another by supporting one another and striving to inspire the world around us.

Several years out of college, I keep connected with the Foundation Family that continues to support me with opportunities for leadership and personal growth.  I have become one of the de facto leaders among the alumni. So much so, that I earned the nickname ‘Dad’ during our time in the mountains of Colorado because of my father-like  nature to always be on the lookout for others in the group. This past year in Connecticut, that nickname became even more relevant when I revealed to the group that I would, in fact, be a real ‘Dad’ come this Christmas.

Looking back on the last decade of how Corvias has “Served on the Homefront” and how that mission has evolved is quite amazing. To get to be a part of it since nearly day one, is nothing short of a miracle. Maria and Melissa are no longer our only “guides”, having added Erin Mathias to the Family, and have become affectionately known as the “Corvi-Aunts”.  Like our biological families, they are a shoulder we can lean on in times of need or a listening ear if we just want to share our good vibes for the week. They show us how to care for others and help us grow.  It’s hard to believe that the Foundation could be any better than it already is, but the Corvias way is to never settle and always ask “How?”. I just hope that I can be a part of the Family for many years to come and continue to do my part in “Serving on the Homefront”.

 

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Welcome, 2017 Scholars & Alumni!

To all of the new scholars & new alumni – welcome (some just to a new chapter) to our Corvias family!

As we gear up for the 2017 Alumni Summit in Chester, CT, it is a great time to highlight the immense benefits of being in this family. First things first – we do call ourselves a family, because we are. When we are together, we have fun, challenge each other, tell jokes & stories, and may even bicker a little – just like a real family. We congratulate successes and support each other in our times of need. We utilize each other as resources to connect to others at professional, personal, and philanthropic levels. We use our social media accounts to check in, ask questions that we think other scholars & alumni can help us with, and share our service learning opportunities. Even when we have been apart for a whole year, we can come together and pick up right where we left off – because people care about truly connecting while we are all together. All in all – we really are a family.

If you just finished high school and are entering our family for the first time – welcome. We love & care about everyone in this group and can’t wait to see your successes and connect with you. This group has so many individuals with such diverse and intricate strengths and abilities that you can draw on to help you thrive in your first year of college (in addition to all of the others!). If you’re feeling homesick, less competent than you were expecting to feel after having so much success in high school (hello calculus that almost made me question my whole life first semester!), excited to have finally found your niche, or proud of all of your accomplishments – feel free to share. Not only have we literally ALL been there, but we have ALL been there for each other over the past decade to support each other through it. Plus, we love to commend you on your hard work & just who you are in general. If you don’t feel comfortable reaching out to a group of strangers, at least keep in contact with Melissa, Erin & Maria. They care about you even more than we do (I know you didn’t think that was possible!), and want nothing more than to see all of you succeed.

If you just graduated college & are entering our family as an alumni – congratulations! Hopefully you have already seen how amazing this group can be and how much you can benefit from engaging with the members of our group. Since graduating 2 years ago, I feel like I have grown so much personally from being a part of our alumni group. The excitement and happiness that we feel before getting together for our alumni summits is unmatchable. Now we get to help each other as we get our first jobs, continue to grad school, get married, grow our families, and continue to engage in service opportunities. It is also a fun time to connect with people who might be going to the college you attended so you can give a few pointers that you wish you might have known. Either way, no matter how long it took (but how short it felt!) to get here – congratulations.

Welcome, welcome, welcome! We hope you have the most amazing time in Boston & that you can connect/reconnect with your incoming/graduating class. Those relationships can become some of the most important in your life. Feel free to reach out to literally anyone during your upcoming journey.

And since we are a family, it is only right to end by saying – welcome home. ❤

Don’t Feel Guilty About Networking

By Benedikt Reynolds

Networking is rough, and I can’t help but feel guilty when it works out. If I’m able to score a job from a professional connection’s recommendation, I end up asking myself: Did I land the job because of my own hard work? Is the company settling? Did I earn it? In 2015, as I transitioned from high school to college, I recognized that many of my peers felt the same way. That we were all discouraged from networking even though we recognized its benefits: opportunities where we could grow as an individual and contribute to the growth of an organization, a cause, or an industry. So, how can we transition our mindsets to embrace networking?

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